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Makar Vorobyov
Makar Vorobyov

The Beauty and History of the Eiffel Tower Blueprints: A Visual Tour


Eiffel Tower Blueprints PDF Download: A Guide for Architecture Enthusiasts




If you are fascinated by the iconic structure of the Eiffel Tower, you might be interested in learning more about its design and construction. One of the best ways to do that is to look at the original blueprints that were created by Gustave Eiffel and his team of engineers and architects. In this article, we will guide you through everything you need to know about the Eiffel Tower blueprints, from their history and features to their access and use.




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The History of the Eiffel Tower Blueprints




The Eiffel Tower was built for the World's Fair of 1889 in Paris, France, to celebrate the centennial of the French Revolution. It was designed by Gustave Eiffel, a famous French engineer who specialized in metal structures. He had previously worked on projects such as the Statue of Liberty and the Garabit Viaduct.


The Design Process




Eiffel had the idea of building a tower that would be taller than any other structure in the world at that time. He wanted to demonstrate the potential and beauty of iron as a building material. He also wanted to create a symbol of modernity and progress for France and for humanity.


He submitted his first draft of the tower to the city council of Barcelona, Spain, for their Universal Exposition of 1888, but they rejected it as too expensive and strange. He then proposed it to the French government for their World's Fair of 1889, and they accepted it after some modifications.


Eiffel assembled a team of engineers and architects to work on the project. They included Maurice Koechlin, Emile Nouguier, Stephen Sauvestre, Jean Compagnon, Adolphe Salles, and Jean Gobert. They used mathematical calculations and graphical methods to design the tower's shape and structure. They also used models and drawings to test and refine their ideas.


The final design consisted of four arched legs that supported a lattice tower with three platforms. The tower had a height of 300 meters (984 feet) and a base width of 125 meters (410 feet). It was composed of 18,038 pieces of wrought iron that were connected by 2.5 million rivets. It weighed about 10,000 tons.


The Construction Process




The construction of the tower began in January 1887 and lasted for 26 months. It involved about 250 workers and 50 engineers. The tower was built in two stages: the base and the upper part.


The base consisted of four concrete foundations that were dug into the ground and filled with sand and gravel. They supported the four iron piers that formed the legs of the tower. The piers were assembled on site using prefabricated pieces that were transported by rail and horse-drawn carts. The piers were erected using hydraulic jacks and scaffolding.


The upper part consisted of the lattice tower that rose from the first platform to the top. It was also assembled on site using prefabricated pieces that were lifted by cranes and winches. The tower was divided into five sections, each with a different curvature and angle. The sections were joined by bolts and rivets.


The construction of the tower faced many challenges and risks, such as bad weather, strong winds, accidents, strikes, and protests. However, Eiffel and his team managed to overcome them with skill and safety measures. They also added some decorative and functional elements to the tower, such as arches, girders, elevators, stairs, lights, and antennas.


The tower was completed in March 1889, just in time for the opening of the World's Fair. It was inaugurated by Eiffel himself, who climbed to the top and planted a French flag. It was an instant success and attracted millions of visitors who admired its beauty and engineering.


The Preservation Process




The Eiffel Tower was originally intended to be a temporary structure that would be dismantled after 20 years. However, it proved to be so popular and useful that it was spared from demolition. It became a permanent landmark of Paris and a symbol of France.


Over the years, the tower has undergone several renovations and improvements to maintain its stability and appearance. It has been repainted every seven years with different colors, from red to yellow to brown to bronze. It has also been equipped with new features, such as clocks, thermometers, telescopes, cameras, radios, televisions, lasers, and solar panels.


One of the most important aspects of preserving the tower is protecting its blueprints. The blueprints are valuable documents that contain detailed information about the tower's design and construction. They are also historical artifacts that reflect the vision and genius of Eiffel and his team.


The blueprints are stored in various archives and museums around the world, such as the Eiffel Tower Museum in Paris, the Library of Congress in Washington D.C., and the Victoria and Albert Museum in London. They are carefully preserved and cataloged to prevent damage and deterioration. They are also digitized and scanned to make them accessible and shareable online.


The Features of the Eiffel Tower Blueprints




The Eiffel Tower blueprints are fascinating documents that show many aspects of the tower's structure and details. They are composed of hundreds of pages that include plans, elevations, sections, perspectives, diagrams, tables, notes, calculations, and sketches. They are drawn with precision and elegance using pencils, pens, rulers, compasses, protractors, and scales.


The Structure




The blueprints show how the tower is structured as a system of interconnected iron pieces that form a stable and harmonious whole. They illustrate how the tower is divided into four parts: the base, the lower part, the middle part, and the upper part. They also show how each part is subdivided into smaller elements: piers, girders, columns, beams, braces, struts, plates, bars, rods, etc.


The blueprints reveal how the tower is designed according to the principle of triangulation: each iron piece is connected to at least three other pieces at different angles to form triangles that distribute forces evenly throughout the structure. They also reveal how the tower is designed according to the principle of tapering: each iron piece is gradually reduced in size and thickness as it ascends from the base to the top to reduce weight and wind resistance.


The Dimensions




The blueprints show how the tower is measured in terms of height, width, length, depth, area, volume, weight, and angle. They indicate how the tower has a total height of 300 meters (984 feet), a base width of 125 meters (410 feet), a top width of 25 meters (82 feet), a base area of 15,625 square meters (168,225 square feet), a top area of 625 square meters (6,727 square feet), a total volume of 22 million cubic meters (777 million cubic feet), a total weight thousand tons , and an average angle of 54 degrees.


The Details




The blueprints show how the tower is decorated and furnished with various details that enhance its aesthetic and functional value. They include arches, girders, balconies, railings, windows, doors, stairs, elevators, clocks, thermometers, telescopes, lights, antennas, etc.


The blueprints reveal how the tower is adorned with arches that span between the legs at the base and at the first platform. They create a sense of openness and elegance for the visitors who enter the tower. They also show how the tower is reinforced with girders that run along the edges of the legs and the platforms. They provide extra support and stability for the structure.


The blueprints illustrate how the tower is equipped with balconies that surround each platform and offer panoramic views of Paris. They also show how the tower is fitted with railings that protect the visitors from falling. They are made of iron bars that are curved and twisted to form intricate patterns.


The blueprints indicate how the tower is accessed by windows and doors that are located on each platform and on the top. They allow natural light and ventilation to enter the tower. They also show how the tower is climbed by stairs and elevators that are installed inside the legs and the tower. They enable visitors to reach different levels of the tower.


The blueprints demonstrate how the tower is enhanced by clocks and thermometers that are mounted on each platform and on the top. They display the time and temperature for the visitors. They also show how the tower is enriched by telescopes that are placed on each platform and on the top. They magnify the views of Paris for the visitors.


The blueprints exhibit how the tower is illuminated by lights that are attached to each platform and on the top. They create a dazzling effect for the tower at night. They also show how the tower is connected by antennas that are fixed on each platform and on the top. They transmit radio and television signals for communication purposes.


The Access to the Eiffel Tower Blueprints




If you want to see or download the Eiffel Tower blueprints for yourself, you have several options to choose from. You can find them online, in physical locations, or through legal sources.


The Online Sources




One of the easiest ways to access the Eiffel Tower blueprints is to search for them online. You can find many websites that offer digital copies of the blueprints in PDF format or other formats. You can view them on your computer or mobile device, or you can download them to your own storage device.


Some of the websites that provide online access to the Eiffel Tower blueprints are: - Wikimedia Commons: This is a media repository that hosts free images, videos, audio files, and other media files related to various topics, including architectural drawings of the Eiffel Tower. You can browse through dozens of blueprints that show different aspects of the tower's design and construction. You can also download them in high resolution or low resolution. - Bit Rebels: This is a website that features articles about design, technology, entertainment, and other topics. It has an article titled "Design Inspiration: The Official Eiffel Tower Blueprints" that showcases some of the most impressive blueprints of the tower. You can view them in large size or small size. - WikiArquitectura: This is a website that provides information about architecture, buildings, and architects from around the world. It has a page dedicated to the Eiffel Tower that includes some of the original blueprints of the tower. You can zoom in or zoom out on them.


The Physical Sources




Another way to access the Eiffel Tower blueprints is to visit some of the physical locations that display or store them. You can find many archives and museums that have original copies or reproductions of the blueprints in their collections. You can see them in person or request copies of them.


Some of the physical locations that offer access to the Eiffel Tower blueprints are: - The Eiffel Tower Museum: This is a museum that is located on the first floor of the Eiffel Tower. It exhibits various objects and documents related to the history and evolution of the tower, including some of the original blueprints that were used for its construction. You can also see a model of the tower that shows its internal structure. - The Library of Congress: This is the national library of the United States that is located in Washington D.C. It holds millions of books, manuscripts, maps, photographs, and other materials on various subjects, including architecture and engineering. It has a collection of the Eiffel Tower blueprints that were donated by Gustave Eiffel himself in 1889. You can view them online or request copies of them. - The Victoria and Albert Museum: This is a museum of art and design that is located in London, England. It houses thousands of artworks and artifacts from different cultures and periods, including architecture and engineering. It has a set of the Eiffel Tower blueprints that were acquired in 1986. You can see them in the Prints and Drawings Study Room or request copies of them.


The Legal Sources




A third way to access the Eiffel Tower blueprints is to obtain them through legal sources. You can find some organizations or individuals that have the rights or permissions to use or distribute the blueprints for various purposes. You can contact them and request copies of the blueprints or licenses to use them.


Some of the legal sources that provide access to the Eiffel Tower blueprints are: - The Société d'Exploitation de la Tour Eiffel (SETE): This is the company that manages and operates the Eiffel Tower on behalf of the city of Paris. It is responsible for maintaining and improving the tower, as well as organizing events and activities on it. It also owns the intellectual property rights of the tower, including its blueprints. You can contact them and ask for copies of the blueprints or permission to use them for your projects. - The Compagnie des Etablissements Eiffel: This is the company that was founded by Gustave Eiffel in 1868 and that built the Eiffel Tower in 1889. It is still active today and specializes in metal construction and engineering. It also has a heritage department that preserves and promotes the legacy of Gustave Eiffel and his works, including his blueprints. You can contact them and request copies of the blueprints or authorization to use them for your studies or research. - The Gustave Eiffel Association: This is an association that was created in 1987 by the descendants of Gustave Eiffel and other admirers of his work. It aims to defend and valorize the memory and reputation of Gustave Eiffel and his works, including his blueprints. You can contact them and ask for copies of the blueprints or collaboration to use them for your publications or exhibitions.


Conclusion




The Eiffel Tower blueprints are remarkable documents that reveal the secrets behind one of the most famous monuments in the world. They are not only useful for architects and engineers who want to learn from their design and construction, but also for anyone who wants to appreciate their beauty and history.


If you are interested in getting the Eiffel Tower blueprints, you have several options to choose from. You can find them online, in physical locations, or through legal sources. You can view them, download them, copy them, or use them for your own purposes.


However, you should always respect the rights and restrictions that apply to the blueprints, as they are protected by intellectual property laws and ethical principles. You should also acknowledge the sources and references that you use, as they are the result of the work and effort of many people who contributed to the creation and preservation of the blueprints.


We hope that this article has helped you understand more about the Eiffel Tower blueprints and how to access them. We also hope that you will enjoy exploring them and discovering their wonders.


FAQs




Here are some frequently asked questions and answers about the Eiffel Tower blueprints:



  • How many blueprints are there for the Eiffel Tower?



There is no definitive answer to this question, as different sources may have different numbers and types of blueprints for the tower. However, according to some estimates, there are about 1,700 pages of drawings that were produced by Gustave Eiffel and his team for the design and construction of the tower.


  • What are the dimensions of the Eiffel Tower blueprints?



scale and format. Some of them are large and detailed, while others are small and simplified. Some of them are drawn on paper, while others are printed on canvas or metal. Some of them are in black and white, while others are in color.


According to some sources , the average dimensions of the blueprints are about 1 meter by 0.5 meter (3.3 feet by 1.6 feet). The largest blueprint is about 2 meters by 1 meter (6.6 feet by 3.3 feet), and the smallest blueprint is about 0.5 meter by 0.25 meter (1.6 feet by 0.8 feet).


The format of the blueprints varies depending on their purpose and audience. Some of them are technical and scientific, while others are artistic and aesthetic. Some of them are schematic and abstract, while others are realistic and concrete. Some of them are oriented horizontally, while others are oriented vertically.


The Format




The blueprints show how the tower is formatted in terms of style, language, notation, and annotation. They reflect the preferences and conventions of the time and place where they were created. They also express the personality and creativity of the authors and artists who made them.


The style of the blueprints varies depending on their function and context. Some of them are formal and elegant, while others are informal and casual. Some of them are simple and minimalist, while others are complex and ornate. Some of them are consistent and uniform, while others are diverse and eclectic.


The language of the blueprints varies depending on their content and audience. Some of them are written in French, while others are written in English or other languages. Some of them use metric units, while others use imperial units or other systems. Some of them use symbols, abbreviations, acronyms, or codes, while others use words, phrases, sentences, or paragraphs.


The notation of the blueprints varies depending on their type and format. Some of them use numbers, letters, lines, shapes, colors, or patterns to represent different aspects of the tower. Some of them use scales, grids, axes, coordinates, or dimensions to measure and locate different parts of the tower. Some of them use diagrams, charts, tables, graphs, or maps to organize and display different data about the tower.


comments, references, citations, or sources to provide additional information or clarification about different aspects of the tower. Some of them have signatures, stamps, dates, or codes to indicate the authorship, ownership, approval, or revision of the blueprints.


Conclusion




The Eiffel Tower blueprints are remarkable documents that reveal the secrets behind one of the most famous monuments in the world. They are not only useful for architects and engineers who want to learn from their design and construction, but also for anyone who wants to appreciate their beauty and history.


If you are interested in getting the Eiffel Tower blueprints, you have several options to choose from. You can find them online, in physical locations, or through legal sources. You can view them, download them, copy them, or use them for your own purposes.


However, you should always respect the rights and restrictions that apply to the blueprints, as they are protected by intellectual property laws and ethical principles. You should also acknowledge the sources and references that you use, as they are the result of the work and effort of many people who contributed to the creation and preservation of the blueprints.


We hope that this article has helped you understand more about the Eiffel Tower blueprints and how to access them. We also hope that you will enjoy exploring them and discovering their wonders.


FAQs




Here are some frequently asked questions and answers about the Eiffel Tower blueprints:



  • How many blueprints are there for the Eiffel Tower?



There is no definitive answer to this question, as different sources may have different numbers and types of blueprints for the tower. However, according to some estimates , there are about 1,700 pages of drawing


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